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This is where Donald Trump's legal cases stand now

Attorneys for Trump have filed to dismiss or delay multiple cases. In one, attorneys say prosecutors waited too long to file charges.
This is where Donald Trump's legal cases stand now
Posted at 8:46 PM, Oct 06, 2023

Attorneys for former President Donald Trump have been very busy this week, filing requests to dismiss two of his criminal cases and delay the trial in the classified documents case. And this comes as we're learning more about some shocking new evidence.

A stunning new report from ABC News alleges former President Trump shared potentially sensitive information about nuclear submarines with Australian billionaire-businessman Anthony Pratt just three months after leaving the White House.

The report states in April of 2021, while at his Mar-a-Lago estate, Trump told Pratt about the exact number of nuclear warheads U.S. subs can carry.

He also reportedly revealed how close they can get to a Russian submarine without being detected.

The report states Pratt then shared the information with "at least 45 people," including his own employees, journalists, and Australian government officials.

Five months later, Australia struck a deal to buy U.S. subs.

Pratt reported the conversation to prosecutors working with special counsel Jack Smith, and has been interviewed at least twice in the last year.

Scripps News has not independently verified this reporting.

SEE MORE: Trump seeks to dismiss federal election case, citing immunity

Meanwhile, Trump lawyers this week asked U.S. District Judge Aileen Cannon to postpone his classified documents trial until "at least" next November, stating they have yet to receive the necessary records needed to prepare his defense.

In his federal election subversion case, the former president is asking for the criminal charges to be dismissed, citing "presidential immunity."

The indictment — handed down by a Washington D.C. grand jury in August — alleges that Trump "illegally plotted" to stay in office after losing the 2020 election to Joe Biden.

Trump's attorneys argue he thought it was within the scope of his duties as president to "ensure election integrity."

His lawyers are ealso pointing to Trump's acquittal by the U.S. Senate on charges that he incited the capitol insurrection.

SEE MORE: Special counsel Jack Smith seeks gag order on Trump in election case

The former president is also trying to have his criminal case related to hush money payments made to former adult film star Stormy Daniels thrown out.

Trump pleaded not guilty on dozens of charges that he falsified business records connected to the payments.

Trump attorneys say prosecutors waited too long to bring the charges and only indicted Trump to interfere with his ongoing 2024 presidential campaign.

The Manhattan District Attorney's Office has not responded yet.

That case is scheduled to go to trial next March.


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