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How remote students can deal with technology fatigue

Students spending hours at a screen
Posted at 6:10 PM, Aug 21, 2020
and last updated 2020-08-21 19:10:45-04

OMAHA, Neb. — Going to school for some students is now as simple as pressing a couple keys on a keyboard. But students are now online for an unprecedented amount of time. We spoke with experts on how to minimize "technology fatigue".

School districts, like Omaha Public Schools, have gone fully virtual overwhelming typical screen time for kids. But remote learning is a different type of screen time.

"This type of screen time is different than what we think of with video games, television, movies," Children's Pediatrician Dr. Shannon Godsil said.

Remote learning screen time is interactive, meaning students are still physically writing, coloring and getting creative.

"I've seen some teachers doing a little bit of an integration of yoga in the middle of their class. So I think teachers are being incredibly creative during this time," Dr. Godsil said.

But students can still become burnt out, wired and not get enough sleep. When we asked OPS officials how they plan on addressing these issues, in a statement they said: "...There are specific challenges a family may face to attend daily classes remotely. We ask that families work with their school principal and classroom teacher to identify individual solutions that may be available."

There's some individual solutions that can also be done right at home.

1. Taking small breaks to move around
2. Eating healthy, as more computer time can lead to more unhealthy snacking
3. Getting 30 to 60 minutes of daily physical activity
4. Making sure kids are getting enough sleep
5. Limiting other technologies