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Teens with diabetes make art for JDRF

Posted: 2:47 PM, Jan 02, 2018
Updated: 2018-01-04 19:00:11Z
Teens with diabetes make art for JDRF
Teens with diabetes make art for JDRF

A group of Omaha residents living with diabetes are trying to help raise money for others like them with an art project for the upcoming JDRF gala. 

Lisa Johnson and George Johnson and Amber Fuller and Elijah Fuller were among those helping. Lisa is an adult living with Type 1 Diabetes (T1D). She and her son, George, who is an art student, are working to create an art piece to be auctioned off at our Gala.

Elijah Fuller, 13, was diagnosed with Type 1 Diabetes at age 9. He and his mom, Amber, worked together to start up the group last year. She also helps organize and facilitate the group of teen artists throughout the year. She recently received her doctorate and knows the importance of peer support to teens living with T1D.

"There's this huge lack of support for teens with diabetes/and looking even further, what are some of the things that are causing this. And the lack of peer support was a big one that is standing out," Fuller said.

The piece will be auctioned off at the JDRF Gala Saturday, Feb. 24 at the CenturyLink Center.

The gala includes cocktails, a silent auction, dinner, live auction and a concert from Eric Paslay.

Founded in 1998, the JDRF Promise Gala is one of the top galas in Omaha, having raised over $9 million for diabetes research since inception.

In 2017, the Promise Gala raised $1.2 million and with over 1,000 guests attending. JDRF is the leading global organization funding type 1 diabetes (T1D) research. JDRF's goal is to progressively remove the impact of T1D from people's lives until we achieve a world without T1D. JDRF collaborates with a wide spectrum of partners and is the only organization with the scientific resources, policy influence, and a working plan to better treat, prevent, and eventually cure T1D.

"Regardless of how much money it makes at the auction it will be nice for them to see it go through that process, and see what it becomes in the end," Fuller said.