News

Actions

What is like to be an experienced storm chaser

Posted at 5:28 PM, May 13, 2016

Everyone talks about the weather, but few are willing to spend their free time just waiting for something to happen.

But for storm chaser Barbara Mayes, weather is literally her life's work.

Barb is a meteorologist at the national weather service in Omaha.

She uses these up-close storm experiences to help her forecast severe weather for the public who rely on accurate information from barb and her colleagues.

Scott Nicholson’s fascination with extreme storms developed when he was 3 years old for him, chasing is not just about capturing a tornado.

To try and piece that puzzle together, this engineer with Raytheon uses his vacation time to share his love for extreme weather with others.

But Scott recommends that anyone with a desire to chase should go out with someone who has at least 5 to 6 years of experience.

That recommendation is more important than ever before.

Even with all the technology chasers have at their finger tips today, there are plenty of hazards to deal with, and it's not always from the tornado.

Barbara Mayes agrees that this is the number one scariest threat she is faced with while tracking storms.

But she is also concerned with the steps that some are taking to get up close and personal with a storm.

It's scenes like this that she is referring too, it's not just a mix of chasers congesting the roads, but even locals wanting to see what is going and in the end the risk isn't worth it if  

That's why she has this advice for anyone chasing.

No doubt devices like this are drawing more and more people to want to capture the storm/tornado and post it to social media.

Our advice is take heed to the warnings when they are issued and go to your safe place.

If you are driving don't stop and get out of your car especially if you've never been chasing before.