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Startup aims to replace concert tickets with facial recognition technology

Posted: 1:32 PM, Mar 29, 2019
Updated: 2019-03-29 18:32:27Z
Startup aims to replace concert tickets with facial recognition technology

Imagine going to a concert or sporting event and not having to wait in long lines to get inside or even having to carry things like your ticket or wallet.

Those enhancements to the fan experience are exactly why Mary Haskett and her business partner created Blink Identity.

"We developed a sensor that can identify people using biometric face matching at full walking speed at any light, even in total darkness," Haskett explains.

Blink Identity was demonstrated at the KNOW Conference in Las Vegas, where dozens of startups specializing in identity technology featured new products.

Here’s how it works:

First, users register their information, like name and email address, on Blink Identity’s website.

Next, users take and upload a selfie of themselves. The photo is then put into Blink’s database.

The next time that user goes to an event, the facial recognition technology scans the user’s face and gives the green light to go in.

If the scanner does not recognize the person, a red light appears and an alert sounds, letting security know that person isn’t authorized to enter.

The technology will cut down on ticket scams and scalpers. Scalpers won't be able to buy tickets in bulk and jack up the prices, because there's no face registered to the ticket. This technology will also spot fake tickets, too.

Blink is still testing the technology, but they are working with Live Nation to try to bring this technology mainstream.

"The whole concept is to get rid of the piece of paper to get rid of the barcode and let your face be your ticket," Haskett says.

Blink Identity hopes one day customers will be able to link their credit card and driver’s license to their account, so they can go wallet-free.