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POSSIBLE POTHOLE SOLUTION: City leaders look to make Omaha streets stronger

"So if there's a way to update them that's a more permanent fix instead of kind of a patch if you will, then that's great."
Posted at 6:18 PM, Jan 31, 2024

OMAHA, Neb. (KMTV) —

  • At Jensen Tire & Auto on 108th & Fort St. an influx of drivers are getting repairs due to the warm weather and potholes.
  • The city public works department introduced a new plan Tuesday to update the cement and additive standards for Omaha streets.
  • On Feb. 13 a public hearing and vote will take place on the updated standards.

BROADCAST TRANSCRIPT:

This warmer weather may feel nice, but when it comes to driving it means dealing with the occasional pothole. At the Jensen Tire & Auto on 108th and Fort St, tires are taking a beating, and drivers are looking for a solution.

"It's this one.... it's like flat."

Kylee Brown was driving on 90th and Maple Tuesday evening when she hit a large pothole.

"And then all of a sudden I hear a big boom like my tire goes in and out like a big speed bump, but it was in and then my tire pressure turned on and I was like my poor tire."

Luckily for her, all she needed was air in her tires.

But Jensen Tire & Auto Store Manager, Eric Welton tells me other drivers have run into bigger pothole issues.

"Sometimes it's much more extensive than that. Sometimes you get steering components, suspension components, wheels that need to be replaced," he said.

This week, the store has seen an influx of drivers coming in with damaged vehicles.

"I had to have a technician go out into the parking lot and fix one because we couldn't drive it into the shop. It was that bad."

Acknowledging that roads are the issue, city leaders are looking at new ways to make Omaha streets stronger.

This updated public works plan introduced Tuesday would set new cement and additive standards for our streets. It's something Eric supports.

"So, if there's a way to update them that's a more permanent fix instead of kind of a patch if you will, then that's great."

Public work officials tell me the last standard specification plan was from 2014. It did not require additives for concrete to help it stand up to the harsh freezing and thawing pattern of winter.

Once the new standards are set, all city contractors will have to follow them for road projects, including pothole fixtures.

so, people like Kylee can drive safely without worry of damaging her car.

"I think it needs to happen I really do. I think it needs to happen," said Kylee.

On Feb. 13, there will be a public hearing and vote on the updated standards.